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Political Socialization Discussion Political Socialization Discussion Political Socialization Discussion Description Refer to pages 202-208 on political socialization in your textbook. How were you politically socialized as a child? Can you remember conversations around politics when you were in primary school (around age 8-10). What were some of the ways you learned about the political establishment through family members and friends? Was family or school, or both the main source of political information? Political socialization is the “process by which individuals learn and frequently internalize a political lens framing their perceptions of how power is arranged and how the world around them is (and should be) organized; those perceptions, in turn, shape and define individuals’ definitions of who they are and how they should behave in the political and economic institutions in which they live.”[1] Political socialization also encompasses the way in which people acquire values and opinions that shape their political stance and ideology: it is a “study of the developmental processes by which people of all ages and adolescents acquire political cognition, attitudes, and behaviors.”[2] It refers to a learning process by which norms and behaviors acceptable to a well running political system are transmitted from one generation to another. It is through the performance of this function that individuals are inducted into the political culture and their orientations towards political objects are formed.[3] Schools, media, and the state have a major influence in this process.[1] Agents of socialization, sometimes referred to as institutions, work together to influence and shape people’s political and economic norms and values. Such institutions include, but are not limited to: families, media, peers, schools, religions, work and legal systems.[1] Agents Family: Families perpetuate values that support political authorities and can heavily contribute to children’s initial political ideological views, or party affiliations.[4] Families have an effect on “political knowledge, identification, efficacy, and participation”, depending on variables such as “family demographics, life cycle, parenting style, parental level of political cynicism and frequency of political discussions.”[5] Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: Political Socialization Discussion Schools: Spending numerous years in school, children in the United States are taught and reinforced a view of the world that “privileges capitalism and ownership, competitive individualism, and democracy.”[1] Through primary, secondary and high schools, students are taught key principles such as individual rights and property, personal responsibility and duty to their nation. Media: Mass media is not only a source of political information; it is an influence on political values and beliefs. Various media outlets, through news coverage and late-night programs, provide different partisan policy stances that are associated with political participation.[5] Religion: Religious beliefs and practices play a role in political opinion formation and political participation. This is evident, for instance, in Arab societies where there is no clear distinction between political cultures and religions. The theological and moral perspectives offered by religious institutions shape judgement regarding public policy, and ultimately, translates to direct “political decision making on governmental matters such as the redistribution of wealth, equality, tolerance for deviance and the limits on individual freedom, the severity of criminal punishment, policies relating to family structure, gender roles, and the value of human life.”[6] Political parties: Scholars such as Campbell (1960) note that political parties have very little direct influence on a child due to a contrast of social factors such as age, context, power, etc.[7] The state: The state is a key source of information for media outlets, and has the ability to “inform, misinform, or disinform the press and thus the public”, a strategy which may be referred to as propaganda, in order to serve a political or economic agenda.[1] Order Now