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Phylum Under the Animal Kingdom Chapter Discussion Phylum Under the Animal Kingdom Chapter Discussion Phylum Under the Animal Kingdom Chapter Discussion Description Choose one of the phylum under the Animal Kingdom, discussed in Chapter 15. Create a profile for that phylum including the following criteria: Explain the key factors that separate this phylum from others in the animal kingdom Show and explain some of the diversity in the phylum Address the economic impacts, good or bad, of the organisms in the phylum Address the ecosystem benefits, good or bad, of the organisms in the phylum The term phylum was coined in 1866 by Ernst Haeckel from the Greek phylon (φῦλον, “race, stock”), related to phyle (φυλή, “tribe, clan”).[4][5] Haeckel noted that species constantly evolved into new species that seemed to retain few consistent features among themselves and therefore few features that distinguished them as a group (“a self-contained unity”). “Wohl aber ist eine solche reale und vollkommen abgeschlossene Einheit die Summe aller Species, welche aus einer und derselben gemeinschaftlichen Stammform allmählig sich entwickelt haben, wie z. B. alle Wirbelthiere. Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: Phylum Under the Animal Kingdom Chapter Discussion Diese Summe nennen wir Stamm (Phylon).” which translates as: However, perhaps such a real and completely self-contained unity is Phylum Under the Animal Kingdom Chapter Discussion the aggregate of all species which have gradually evolved from one and the same common original form, as, for example, all vertebrates. We name this aggregate [a] Stamm [i.e., race] (Phylon). In plant taxonomy, August W. Eichler (1883) classified plants into five groups named divisions, a term that remains in use today for groups of plants, algae and fungi.[1][6] The definitions of zoological phyla have changed from their origins in the six Linnaean classes and the four embranchements of Georges Cuvier.[7] Informally, phyla can be thought of as groupings of organisms based on general specialization of body plan.[8] At its most basic, a phylum can be defined in two ways: as a group of organisms with a certain degree of morphological or developmental similarity (the phenetic definition), or a group of organisms with a certain degree of evolutionary relatedness (the phylogenetic definition).[9] Attempting to define a level of the Linnean hierarchy without referring to (evolutionary) relatedness is unsatisfactory, but a phenetic definition is useful when addressing questions of a morphological nature—such as how successful different body plans were. Order Now