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NU 631 Week 9 Assignment 2: Complete Your Literature Review Matrix NU 631 Week 9 Assignment 2 Complete Your Literature Review Matrix NU 631 Week 9 Assignment 2: Complete Your Literature Review Matrix APA Reference         Research Question Type of Study Research Design Sample, Sample Size, and How Selected Instruments Used, Reliability and Validity, Data Collection Methods Results (including statistical analysis Consistent with other Literature) Limitations.                  Samuriwo, Ray (PhD. Student) October 2010,   Effects of education and experience on nurses’ value of ulcer prevention,   British Journal of Nursing (Tissue Viability Supplement) volume 19 Number 20 (2010) What value do nurses place on pressure ulcer prevention? To determine the value that nurses place on pressure ulcer prevention.         Qualitative       Welsh Straussian grounded theory study Female Nurses ranging from second year nursing student to senior nurse managers recruited from a non-acute medical ward of 14 hospitals in one NHS trust and a university n=16 -Convenience sampling. No specific information given. -Indirect measures with, semi-structured focus group interviews. -Instrument reliable because values are ambiguous and mean different things to different people. -Nurses talked about their experiences about looking after patients with pressure ulcers, and the researcher elicited their values from what they said. -Data was collected in a two-stage process and interpreted through the Straussian grounded theory. -Results were positive, as all the participants revealed how the value, they placed on pressure ulcer prevention had gone from low to high. -All identified the same key landmarks even though they had different levels of education and experience, become more proactive in preventing pressure ulcers -The key point in transition being an encounter with a patient with a high-grade pressure ulcer caused the nurses to reappraise their values. -Education that nurses receive on pressure ulcer, prevention only appears to alter their value when they have some experience of looking after patients with pressure ulcer.   Sample size small, non- randomized not statistically significant, high concern for bias, minimum requirement is 20-30 individuals -Lack of hands on of the participants, most interventions delegated to health care assistants and students. -Values are primarily established by personal experience, an old weaker derived source of evidence. -Researcher is a student not an expert on the subject. -Gender exclusive participants all women in. -No statistical information given provided for comparison of high or low values. Jeff Poss, et al.,Development of the inter RAI (Resident Assisted Instrument) Pressure Ulcer Risk Scale (PURS) for use in long-term care and home setting,   BioMed Central (BMC) doi:10.1186/1471-2318-10-67             The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessment, mandated for use in Ontario LTC homes, to inform the risk of Pressure Ulcers (PU).   Quasi-experimental non-equivalent group design study.   Comparative correlations design, using independent and dependent variables -Included an admission or baseline MDS assessment of residents having a stay of 14 days or longer (median time 91 days) -Three LTC homes with n=257 with MDS and Braden Scale assessments; n=12,896 from eight LTC homes with baseline/ reassessment of MDS data, n=13,062 from Complex Continuing Care Hospital (CCC) and n=73,183 from long stay home care clients. All assessed during the same time, restricted to those with no recorded pressure ulcer. -All assessments were done by trained clinical staff.             -Assessment using the RAI, data collection and analysis -spearman Rank Correlation (all significant at p<0.0001 Logistic regression of new Pressure ulcers was used to determine those MDS items was statistically significant (at p=0.05 or below) in a multivariable, parsimonious model. MDS items higher numbers more impairment   Instrument was valid but unreliable according to previously collected data -LTC homes the Braden scale was tested for its predictive ability with PU down to 1%from 9% with a c-statistic of 0.676. In CCC patients, distribution skewed towards the high-risk end of 9.7% with a c-statistic 0.607. In long stay home care, inter RAI PURS leaned more towards low risk much lower that, in LTC and CCC at 2.6% with c-statistic of 0.629 data analyzed using the   SAS and SAS enterprise Miner Tree Desktop version 9.1.3 were used for all data analyses -consistent with other literatures such as quality improvement in nursing homes (Abel RL 2005) and A longitudinal study of risk factors associated with the formation of PU (Brandeis GH et al 1994 -Risk assessment tools, including the Braden Scale, have been criticized for their generally weak properties D. Anthony et al (JCN 2008) -No information available for palliative and hospital Study not randomized controlled -Demographic information was unavailable for Braden scale sample. -Sample presented predominantly elder female residents. Possibility of under reporting pressure ulcers such as stage Lavallée, J. F., Gray, T. A., Dumville, J., & Cullum, N. (2019). Preventing pressure ulcers in nursing homes using a care bundle: A feasibility study. Health & Social Care in the Community, 27(4). https://doi.org/10.1111/hsc.12742           To examine implementation delivery and fidelity, staff views on using the intervention; and to investigate general study issues such as nursing home retirement and retention. Quantitative And Qualitative Mixed method feasibility study involving quantitative uncontrolled before and after study of the bundle. Qualitative semi structured face to face in 462 bed days were collected prior to implementing the bundle. Data of 1181 bed days was collected in the intervention phase. Quantitative data was collected for 5 weeks during monitoring of pressure ulcer prevention behavior by staff. Data collection went on for 9 weeks during implementation phase. Used three evidence-based elements: support surface, skin inspection and repositioning. Intervention such as intervention champions were incorporated. Each intervention had a behavioral change attached In recruitment and retention phase, nursing staff was unable to continue with the study due to staff shortage. Of the 21 participants (n=21) for nurses and healthcare assistants and (n=29) for residents in one nursing home, 12 attended the in-person training session (nurses (n=3), healthcare assistants (n=8), manager (n=1) and 4 participated in face-to-face interviews (n=4), it’s only the 4 that also attended the training. *Pre-intervention phase, 75% adherence to repositioning was noted. 5 more pressure ulcer cases were documented. *Intervention phase, 1181 data collected, no more cases were documented.   The study was a small scale, relying on self-reported behavior and participants knew their ulcers were being monitored. Inability to collect demographic information due to lack of ethical approval. Poor adherence rated due to several implementation issues, understaffing, disagreement with the content of the bundle The study was a small scale, relying on self-reported behavior and participants knew their ulcers were being monitored. Inability to collect demographic information due to lack of ethical approval. Poor adherence rated due to several implementation issues, understaffing, disagreement with the content of the bundle.   Clarke, M., Moore, Z., Patton, D., O’Connor, T., & Nugent, L. (2017). The impact of an educational intervention on home support workers’ ability to detect early pressure ulcer damage. British Journal of Community Nursing, 22(Sup12). https://doi.org/10.12968/bjcn.2017.22.sup12.s6           The purpose for this study is to investigate impact of education on home support worker’s ability to detect pressure ulcers at an early stage No specific type of study was mentioned. Repeated measure designs were used to quantify the effectiveness of educational intervention, that consisted of one pre-test and two post-tests There were 150 potential study subjects. This study consisted of 27 home support workers. With the sample, 56% of participants had previously received education on pressure ulcer management, and 44% stated that they had never received training regarding ulcer detection   Prior to the beginning of the study a set of 20 photographs of pressure ulcers were validated by experts. At baseline (pre-education) 58% of photographs were placed correctly. At post-test 1, 55% of the photographs were correctly placed and post-test 2, the 58% were placed right, showing an increase, and achieving baseline scores. A moderate negative relationship was noted pre-training and post testing 2 scores (r= -0.44; n=27; p=0.02). The setting and sample are not described in adequate detail. Participants were gathered using convenience sampling, which might have led to biases during testing. This study consisted of a small sample of home health care workers that were in compact areas. One of the primary limitations of this study was the focus on correct ulcer classification instead of common misinterpretations. The findings appear to be trustworthy, however the small sample size and setting limits the amount of insight given about current pressure ulcer detection.       Avşar, P., & Karadağ, A. (2017). Efficacy and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Evidence-Based Nursing Interventions to Maintain Tissue Integrity to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 15(1), 54–61. https://doi.org/10.1111/wvn.12264         The purpose of the study was to determine the cost-effectiveness and efficacy of evidence-based   nursing intervention has on increasing tissue tolerance by maintain skin integrity Repeated measure design type of study was used. It was the frst time such kind of a study had been used. Questionnaires were used for this study. 154 adults enrolled into the program, 77 participants were the intervention group and another 77 were in the control group. The participants were all patients in in the cardiovascular department. The participants filled out questions about their health. Instruments included the Braden pressure ulcer risk assessment scale (BPURAS), Incontinence associated Dermatitis (IAD), Pressure ulcer identification form, Patient characteristics form and a cost table for all interventions. There was a deterioration of tissue integrity that was witnessed in 18.2% of patients in the intervention group compared to 54.5% in the control group (p<.05). The cost of increased tissue tolerance prevention in both the intervention and control groups was X= $204.34+41.07 and $138.90+1.70 respectively. Only two groups in the cardiovascular department were studied hence limiting the results. Unbeck, M., Sterner, E., Elg, M., Fossum, B., Thor, J., & Pukk Härenstam, K. (2013). Design, application and impact of quality improvement ‘theme months’ in orthopaedic nursing: A mixed method case study on pressure ulcer prevention. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 50(4), 527–535. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2013.02.002           The purpose of this study is to report on the design and application of quality improvement theme months in orthopaedic nursing and evaluate the impact on PU as an example.   Mixed method study Retrospective mixed method with time series diagram The sample was taken from a 52-orthopedic department in a Swedish hospital where at least 3700 patients are admitted yearly. Some of the ways that this data was collected is through participant observation of improvement theme months, retrospective record review, review of hospital performance indicator measurements using statistical process control. Hospital process performance was assessed using a modified Norton scale. Impact on patient outcome was detected through retrospective record review. Patterns of theme months’ impact over time; was recorded through descriptive statistics and time series diagrams.   This was a 46 monthly point prevalence with samples ranging from 28-66 admissions. Substantial improvements were found in risk assessments rates for pressures in both longitudinal follow-up (P<0.001) and in the annual county council-wide measurements. Reduction in pressure ulcer rate was seen in county council-wide measurements. In the longitudinal, wider variations were noted (P<0.067). There was a decrease in pressure ulcer rates in the final ten-month period of the study. Retrospective record review was limited by the availability of data; missing data due to poor documentation will lead us to underestimate the true PU rates. Attribution may have contributed to the changes in performances.     Terris, DD PhD; Woo ,CMS; Jarezok, MN, Dipl.rer.soc,; Ho, CH, MD (2011) Department of Veterans Affairs   Comparison of in-person and digital photograph assessment of stage III and IV pressure ulcers among veterans with spinal cord injuries   Journal of Rehabilitation Research &Development. Volume 48, (3) 215-224 doi:10.1682/JRRD.2010.03.0036       To investigate the assessment agreement when stage III and IV pressure ulcers in individuals with Spinal cord injuries were evaluated in person and with the use of digital photographs. Quantitative study Comparative descriptive design   -Purposive sampling, recruited sequentially on admission, -With one distinct Stage III or IV Pressure Ulcer in the pelvic region or lower limb. -Could be positioned and remained motionless for photography. -Informed consent and Health insurance portability and Accountability Act (HIPA) for photograph permission. -Observations -Collection of artifacts (photographs), handwritten materials -Description -Two wound care nurses of similar training assessed the wounds (in person) -Third study team member assessed wound in person &took the digital Pictures -Both methods done after dressing was removed.   Supported the use of digital photography-based assessment of wound status in employing Tele-health approach of stage III&IV Pressure Ulcers management. *There were persistent differences in assessors’ subjective perception of qualitative wound characteristics, with both methods. -In both methods interrater agreement remained moderate (50%) demonstrating with level of agreement beyond chance to improve to 72.7% -For 10 randomly selected wounds, both nurses applied both methods of assessments resulting in fewer wound descriptor categories with insufficient data for analysis Greta Krapohl, RN, MSN Doctoral candidate et al;   Nursing Specialty Certificate and Nursing- Sensitive Patient Outcomes in Intensive Care Units.   American Journal of Critical Care 9AJCC) November 2010 Doi:10.4037/ajcc2010406           Is there an inverse association between the proportion of certified nurses on a unit and the rate of nurse-sensitive adverse outcome for patient?   To determine if an association exists between the proportion of nurses on an intensive care unit who are certified and the rate of adverse outcomes for patients on that unit Non experiment correlational descriptive survey cross section, retrospective design Sample consisted of 25 adult intensive care units at eight hospitals n=866 limited to staff nurses only Instruments * Survey questionnaires, *Data collection on three dependent variables likely to be sensitive to nursing practice.   Tools Reliable and valid for this study type as about 97% of surveys were retuned. r=0.397, p=0.05). -Data analyzed using the SPSS statistical software program, very few research literature is available on the on the topic to link nursing specialty certificate with enhanced patient outcome 462 Surveys completed, 450 included in the final analysis. -No significant relationship was found between the proportion of certified nurses and any of the three sensitive patient outcomes (r=0.397, p=0.05). *Data analyzed using the SPSS statistical software program, very few research literature is available on the on the topic to link nursing specialty certificate with enhanced patient outcome -Study was non- experimental, cross-sectional, retrospective design. – limited sample size focused on a narrow geographical area -Generalized nonspecific data on nursing certification may not have the sensitivity to detect specific outcomes used in the analysis. -Study secondary analysis confined to previously collected data (Cohort study)                       NU 631 Week 9 Assignment 2: Complete Your Literature Review Matrix Value: 100 points Due: Day 7 Grading Category: Assignments Instructions You began your literature review matrix in Week 4 Assignment 1: Start Your Literature Review Matrix, where you completed two articles for the matrix. Using the same document you submitted for the Week 4 Assignment, complete the matrix by adding six more articles and filling in each of the rows for each article that are directly related to your study that you are writing about in your Review of the Literature Section of your EBP Project Proposal. Please refer to the Grading Rubric for details on how this activity will be graded. NU 631 Week 9 Assignment 2 Complete Your Literature Review Matrix Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS:NU 631 Week 9 Assignment 2: Complete Your Literature Review Matrix To Submit Your Assignment: Select the Add Submissions button. Drag or upload your file to the File Picker. Select Save Changes. Literature Matrix Grading Rubric Literature Matrix Grading Rubric – 100 Points Criteria Exemplary Exceeds Expectations Advanced Meets Expectations Intermediate Needs Improvement Novice Inadequate Total Points Inclusion of Eight Research Articles All eight articles are presented in the Matrix. 25 points Six articles of the eight are present. 20 points Five articles of the eight are present. 18 points Four or less articles of the eight are present. 16 points 25 Completeness of Each Grid Criteria All the grid criteria are completed: Research question/purpose; type of study, design, sample, methods (instruments, reliability, validity, data collection), results, and limitations. 25 points one or two criteria are not completed. 20 points More than two criteria are not completed. 18 points Most of the criteria are not completed. 16 points 25 Understanding of Research Concepts All of entries in the matrix demonstrate understanding of the research concepts: Research question/purpose; type of study, design, sample, methods (instruments, reliability, validity, data collection results), and limitations. 25 points one or two entries do not demonstrate understanding of the research concepts. 20 points More than two entries do not demonstrate understanding of the research concepts. 18 points Most of the entries do not demonstrate understanding of the research concepts. 16 points 25 Readability All the Matrix entries are clearly and succinctly presented. The entries are readily understood by the reader. 25 points one or two entries are not clearly and succinctly presented. Generally, the entries are readily understood. 20 points More than two entries are not clearly and succinctly presented. Generally, the entries are not readily understood. 18 points Most entries are not clearly and succinctly presented. Generally, the entries are not readily understood. 16 points 25 Total Points 100 Order Now