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Ethiopathogenesis of Pediatric Community Acquired Pneumonia Presentation Ethiopathogenesis of Pediatric Community Acquired Pneumonia Presentation Ethiopathogenesis of Pediatric Community Acquired Pneumonia Presentation Description Etiology of pediatric pneumonia, differential diagnosis, diagnostics, management Should be familiar with medical terminologies, and complicated pathology subjects Globally, pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children younger than the age of 5 years. Although the majority of deaths attributed to pneumonia in children are mostly in the developing world, the burden of disease is substantial, and there are significant healthcare-associated costs related to pneumonia in the developed world. This activity reviews the cause, pathophysiology, and presentation of pediatric pneumonia and highlights the role of the interprofessional team in its management. Objectives: Identify the etiology of pediatric pneumonia. Review the presentation of pediatric pneumonia. Outline the treatment and management options available for pediatric pneumonia. Describe interprofessional team strategies for improving care coordination and outcomes in pediatric patients with pneumonia. Access free multiple choice questions on this topic. Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: Ethiopathogenesis of Pediatric Community Acquired Pneumonia Presentation Go to: Introduction Globally, pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children younger than the age of 5 years.[1] Although the majority of deaths attributed to pneumonia in children are mostly in the developing world, the burden of disease is substantial, and there are significant healthcare-associated costs related to pneumonia in the developed world.[2] Go to: Etiology The etiology of pneumonia in the pediatric population can be classified by age-specific versus pathogen-specific organisms.[3] Neonates are at risk for bacterial pathogens present in the birth canal, and this includes organisms such as group B streptococci, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes.[4][5][6] Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus can be identified in late-onset neonatal pneumonia.[4] Viruses are the main cause of pneumonia in older infants and toddlers between 30 days and 2 years old.[7] In children 2 to 5 years old, respiratory viruses are also the most common.[8][9] The rise of cases related to S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae type B is observed in this age group.[10][11] Mycoplasma pneumonia frequently occurs in children in the range from 5 to 13 years old[12][13]; however, S. pneumoniae is still the most commonly identified organism.[8] Adolescents usually have the same infectious risks as adults. It is important to consider tuberculosis (TB) in immigrants from high prevalence areas, and children with known exposures. Children with chronic diseases are also at risk for specific pathogens. In cystic fibrosis, pneumonia secondary to S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is ubiquitous.[14] Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk of infection from encapsulated organisms.[15] Children who are immunocompromised should be evaluated for Pneumocystis jirovecii, cytomegalovirus, and fungal species if no other organism is identified.[16] Unvaccinated children are at risk for vaccine-preventable pathogens. Order Now