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Ethical Issues in Psychology Discussion Ethical Issues in Psychology Discussion Ethical Issues in Psychology Discussion Description Integrated services, collaboration, and consultation are common in the field of psychology. Psychologists work with a wide range of providers (each having their own ethical standards) in tangential fields including, but not limited to, legal entities, children and family services, counselors, educators, and those in the medical field. Should the APA ethics code regarding external factors such as resolving ethical issues, human relations, advertising and public statements, research, and publication, and therapy be applied to these tangential fields? Why or why not?Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Including 2010 Amendments Read “Standard 1,” “Standard 3,” “Standard 5,” “Standard 8,” and “Standard 10.” American Psychological Association. (2010). Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct: Including 2010 amendments. Washington, DC: Author. This may help. https://www.apa.org/ethics/code/index# Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct: Including 2010 Amendments Read “Standard 1,” “Standard 3,” “Standard 5,” “Standard 8,” and “Standard 10.” American Psychological Association. (2010). Ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct: Including 2010 amendments. Washington, DC: Author. Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: Ethical Issues in Psychology Discussion Student Members The dual relationship – the Neophyte dilemma Karen Howells EARLY THREE YEARS AGO I embarked on the British Psychological Society (BPS) Qualification in Sport and Exercise Psychology (QSEP) to qualify as an accredited sport psychologist. Now, approaching the final stages of that qualification I am reflecting on an aspect of the process that has presented me with an ongoing dilemma – the appropriateness of my dual relationship for the first two years of my practice as a Level 2 UKCC Ethical Issues in Psychology Discussion swimming coach, and as a sport psychology practitioner in training. In occupying this dual relationship I found that there were pragmatic and complementary benefits for my coaching and consultancy practice, but also areas of conflict that had ethical and practical implications. In order to qualify for the QSEP award there are four components that need to be covered: Teaching and Dissemination Activities, Sport/Exercise Consultancy Work, a Research Project, and Continuing Professional Development (CPD). The qualification handbook guides candidates on the range of allocations that accommodate candidates in different working positions. The minimum number of hours for consultancy comprises 400 hours actual contact hours. Like many of my contemporaries the prospect of finding enough clients to attain this requirement was troubling a prospect. Access to clients for those with little or no applied experience is difficult, and for the neophyte practitioner there is little guidance on how to market oneself and generate business. Several of my supervisory peer group including myself, considered ways to gain clients and decided that identifying clients N Sport & Exercise Psychology Review, Vol. 10 No. 3 © The British Psychological Society 2014 through our current sporting and coaching networks would be a viable option. Consequently, several of our group supervision sessions were dedicated to addressing the potential advantages and disadvantages of accessing clients in this way to ensure that we maintained ongoing reflection of the issue and ethical practice. Pragmatic and complementary benefits Buceta (1993) highlighted the pragmatic and complementary aspects of combining roles with a view to achieving greater positive outcomes. He argued that combining the technical knowledge of a coach, knowledge of sport psychology, and knowledge of the intricacies of a training regime has positive consequences. Prior to commencing the Stage 2 qualification I had spent 10 years coaching development, age group, and youth swimmers and was in a voluntary coaching role. As such, I had a good sportspecific understanding of the needs of competitive swimming and of individual swimmers in particular. At the start of my qualification I was confident that not only would I be able to incorporate psychological skills, particularly imagery and goal setting into the swimmers’ daily swimming training, but that the use of group, individual, and embedded sessions had the potential to enhance both the swimmers’ performances and the quality of my coaching. Furthermore, I was able to rationalise my dual role position in that I coached a number of swimmers who I felt would benefit from structured sport psychology involvement, yet they were either not at a level or from a socioeconomic background that would have 87 Karen Howells prompted their parents to approach and pay for a sport psychologist (SP). Order Now