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DQ1 Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care DQ1 Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care DQ1 Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care Week 1 Discussion DQ1 Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care. Are we obligated to provide access to and coverage for health care for all Americans as an entitlement (a right), or should health care be considered a commodity that is subject to the influences of economic, social, and market demand (supply and demand)? Be sure to include the rationale for your position in your discussion. DQ1 Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS:DQ1 Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care   DQ1 Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care. Are we obligated to provide access to and coverage for health care for all Americans as an entitlement (a right), or should health care be considered a commodity that is subject to the influences of economic, social, and market demand (supply and demand)? Be sure to include the rationale for your position in your discussion. ORDER NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT: Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care NUR 567 Discuss your position regarding access to and coverage for health care NUR 567 Healthcare As A Commodity NUR 567 Healthcare As A Commodity The commodity argument posits that the marketplace should govern demand, supply, and costs of care. … The argument that health care is a right posits that it is a need, not a choice, and that government should regulate care standards that may be compromised as insurers attempt to minimize costs. Is health care a right or a commodity? Implementing mental health reform in a recession Neil Krishan Aggarwal 1, Michael Rowe, Michael A Sernyak Affiliations expand PMID: 21041355 DOI: 10.1176/ps.2010.61.11.1144 Abstract The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, signed into law by President Obama in March 2010, contains elements of two seemingly contradictory positions: health care as a commodity and as a right. The commodity argument posits that the marketplace should govern demand, supply, and costs of care. The law’s establishment of state insurance exchanges reflects this position. The argument that health care is a right posits that it is a need, not a choice, and that government should regulate care standards that may be compromised as insurers attempt to minimize costs. The law’s requirement for coverage of mental and substance use disorders reflects this position. This Open Forum examines these arguments in light of current state fiscal crises and impending reforms. Despite the federal government’s interest in expanding prevention and treatment of mental illness, states may demonstrate varying levels of commitment, based in part on their perception of health care as a right or a commodity. The federal government should outline clear performance standards, with minimum services specified to maximize state commitments to services. Order Now