(240)-343-2585 info@essaymerit.com

Database Project Proposal – Part 1 Database Project Proposal – Part 1 Database Project Proposal – Part 1 The database is one of the essential tools required in the management of data both at the individual and organizational level. Databases can be integrated with different applications to enhance the collection, storage, and analysis of data. With the increased application of technology in the healthcare settings, databases are increasingly becoming common in healthcare institutions. A database is an organized collection of data, generally stored and can be accessed electronically from the computer system. Databases are always more complex and usually developed through formal design and different modelling techniques. Before engaging in the development of databases, it is necessary to formulate a project proposal that can guide the development processes (Grachev et al., 2018). For databases to be fully implemented by healthcare institutions, they are always required to be efficient and secure. Databases carry critical information about patients and different activities being undertaken in the healthcare processes. Asa result, they can be a target for hackers who may want to compromise information. In the development process, developers ought to integrate proper security measures by adhering to the requirements in the development process. Statement of The Project Problem and Definition of Terms Databases are always used to solve different problems often encountered in the management of data. Well-designed databases can improve the efficiency of work and withstand security threats from hackers. Today, most healthcare institutions face challenges in the management of patients’ information and controlling the activities in the healthcare system. Also, with the increase in the number of patients and improvement in the operational processes, healthcare organizations are always looking for much more efficient database systems that can be applied to improve operational processes (Faqihuddin et al., 2020). The current databases used in the management of patients are vulnerable to constant attacks that often expose confidential information about patients and healthcare professionals. To address these issues, there is the need for effective databases designed from modern resources or tools. Definition of terms Database: an organized collection of data, generally stored and can be accessed electronically from the computer system Data: statistics or facts collected together for analysis or references Command: String or information send to the server to process information Server: Computer that provides data to other computers. Code: term applied to describe statements written in a specific programming language Database Project Proposal – Part 1 The purpose of this assignment is to provide learners a basic understanding for identifying a database project proposal for collecting data and for designing and developing a small database that can be used to compile and report clinical data related to either quality measures or pharmaceutical products and utilization. To complete Part 1 of the Database Project Proposal assignment, create a 500-750-word proposal outlining the following elements: Statement of the project problem and definition of terms. Identify database users (personnel/credentials): Who are they? What are their competencies and background? Discuss the types of data that users will collect for the proposed database and describe at least three reports that will be generated for analysis. Explain their use and who will use the reports? Describe the project goals and clear measurable objectives for the database. Identify the steps you will take to meet the goals and objectives. Forecast any potential problems or barriers to meeting the project goals and objectives. Are there any specific assumptions that need to be made? Conclude with the value of the project with emphasis on feasibility and the benefit of the expected results. There are three parts to the database project proposal. The initial step involves identifying an idea for a database and describing its purpose. The second part allows you to design the database components. The third part requires you to present the database proposal to stakeholders. Feedback from the instructor at every stage will help you make improvements in the database project. PART 3 In the final phase of the Database Design Proposal assignment, you are required to design a working prototype of the proposal. You will be required to utilize SQLite Database. The SQLite database is a small, lightweight database application, suited for learning SQL and database concepts, or to just explore some database-related ideas without requiring a full-blown database management system (DBMS). Refer to “Supplement: SQL Examples for SQLite Database,” for the link to the SQLite Database download and examples. Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: Database Project Proposal – Part 1 The working prototype should include the following: 1) Provide a brief synopsis (utilizing research from related assignments) analyzing the detailed requirements of your prototype database design. 2) Design a database prototype that includes diagrams, data dictionary, design decisions, limitations, etc. The database should consist of at least four tables, two different user roles, and two reports. APA format is not required, but solid academic writing is expected. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment. PART 2 Details: In reference to your Database Design Proposal: Proposal Outline, provide a narrative analysis of the customer and user needs by defining the customers and users as well as describing their individual needs. Information to consider includes: 1) What types of information or data would the users of the proposed system like to have compiled. What would this data provide evidence of or answer? Provide specific examples. 2) What kinds of reports would the users of the proposed system like to be able to generate. 3) What is the feasibility of the proposal? Do you think the proposal is feasible or possible? Why or why not? What possible problems or barriers do you foresee? Are there any specific assumptions which need to be made? The assignment may be completed in the form of question answer (Q/A) format or an outline. APA format is not required, but solid academic writing is expected. This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment. Supplement: SQL Examples for SQLite Database The SQLite database is a tiny, lightweight database application, suited for learning SQL and database concepts, or to just explore some database-related ideas without requiring a full-blown database management system (DBMS). The interested reader is encouraged to work through the SQL commands listed below, in the order in which they are provided. After the initial “Provider” table is created and populated, try imagining what the result of the next SQL statement would be, then enter/paste the statement and compare the output to what you expected. Feel free to explore on your own. The structure and contents of the initial “Provider” table will look something like this: ProviderID  FirstName   LastName    HireDate ———-  ———-  ———-  ———- 123456      Ben         Spock 123457      Albert      Schweitzer  1912-05-09 123458      Derek       Shepherd    2005-03-27 123459      Mark        Sloan       2005-03-27 You can download the executable free of charge directly from the SQLite project Web site at http://sqlite.org, which also provides extensive documentation and tutorials on its usage. The lines below that start with two dashes ‘–’ are SQL comments, and thus would not get executed if pasted into the SQLite command window. All other SQL commands must be terminated by a semicolon ‘;’ — set SQLite output format .header on .mode column   — data definition, manipulation and initial population — —————————————————- CREATE TABLE Provider ( ProviderID char(6) not null, FirstName varchar(24) not null, LastName varchar(64) not null, PRIMARY KEY (ProviderID)  );   INSERT INTO Provider ( ProviderID, LastName, FirstName) VALUES ( ‘123456’, ‘Spock’, ‘Benjamin M’ ) ;   — (to see the current structure and contents of the table, use this statement below:) SELECT * FROM Provider;   ALTER TABLE Provider ADD COLUMN HireDate date;   UPDATE Provider SET FirstName = ‘Ben’ WHERE ProviderID=’123456′;   — further populate table — ———————-   INSERT INTO Provider ( ProviderID, LastName, FirstName, HireDate) VALUES ( ‘123457’, ‘Schweitzer’, ‘Albert’, ‘1912-05-09’ ) ; INSERT INTO Provider ( ProviderID, LastName, FirstName, HireDate) VALUES ( ‘123458’, ‘Shepherd’, ‘Derek’, ‘2005-03-27’ ) ; INSERT INTO Provider ( ProviderID, LastName, FirstName, HireDate) VALUES ( ‘123459’, ‘Sloan’, ‘Mark’, ‘2005-03-27’ ) ;   — querying — ——– SELECT * FROM Provider;   SELECT LastName, HireDate FROM Provider;   SELECT DISTINCT HireDate FROM Provider;   SELECT LastName, FirstName FROM Provider WHERE ProviderID = ‘123456’;   SELECT ProviderID, LastName FROM Provider WHERE HireDate >= ‘2010-01-01’;   SELECT * FROM Provider WHERE HireDate BETWEEN ‘1900-01-01’ AND ‘2000-01-01′;   SELECT ProviderID, LastName FROM Provider WHERE HireDate IS NULL;   — adding a new column ‘Salary’ to the table ALTER TABLE Provider ADD COLUMN Salary float; UPDATE Provider SET Salary = 65000 WHERE ProviderID=’123456′; UPDATE Provider SET Salary = 9500 WHERE ProviderID=’123457′; UPDATE Provider SET Salary = 142000 WHERE ProviderID=’123458′; UPDATE Provider SET Salary = 130000 WHERE ProviderID=’123459’;   SELECT * FROM PROVIDER;   — column functions — —————- SELECT SUM(Salary) FROM Provider; SELECT AVG(Salary) FROM Provider; SELECT MIN(Salary), AVG(Salary), MAX(SALARY) FROM Provider;   SELECT COUNT(*) FROM Provider; SELECT COUNT(HireDate) FROM Provider; SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT HireDate) FROM Provider;   — aggregation — ———– SELECT HireDate, COUNT(*) FROM PROVIDER GROUP BY HireDate;   SELECT HireDate, COUNT(*) FROM PROVIDER GROUP BY HireDate HAVING COUNT(*) > 1;   — multi-table queries; joining — —————————-   — create and populate a second table CREATE TABLE Patient ( PatientID char(6) not null, FirstName varchar(24) not null, LastName varchar(64) not null, DOB date, PrimaryProviderID char(6), PRIMARY KEY (PatientID)  ); INSERT INTO Patient VALUES (‘000001’, ‘Brad’, ‘Parker’, ‘1986-03-22’, ‘123458’); INSERT INTO Patient VALUES (‘000002’, ‘Jennifer’, ‘Miller’, ‘2002-12-09’, ‘123459’); INSERT INTO Patient VALUES (‘000003’, ‘Olivia’, ‘Silverman’, null, ‘123459’); INSERT INTO Patient VALUES (‘000004’, ‘John’, ‘Smith’, ‘1955-07-14’, null); SELECT * FROM Patient;   — multi-table queries SELECT *  FROM Provider, Patient WHERE patient.primaryProviderID=provider.ProviderID;   SELECT Patient.LastName, Patient.FirstName, Patient.DOB, Provider.LastName FROM Provider, Patient WHERE patient.primaryProviderID=provider.ProviderID;   SELECT Patient.LastName, Patient.FirstName, Patient.DOB, Provider.LastName FROM Provider JOIN Patient ON primaryProviderID=ProviderID;   PART 4 Details:   1) In reference to your proposed Database Design Proposal, consider a situation where you want to track (and ultimately reduce) the occurrences of a risk incident within the environment you selected. 2) Identify and select an incident in which you are interested. An example of an incident could be that which is acquired or occurred during hospital stays. 3) Develop a 750–1,000 word proposal from the perspective of the Health Information Manager, which includes a specification of the requirements, the proposed solution, the database design and/or modifications to existing databases, and a breakdown of responsibilities among staff to collect, analyze, and disseminate the information. 4) This assignment uses a grading rubric. Instructors will be using the rubric to grade the assignment; therefore, students should review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the assignment criteria and expectations for successful completion of the assignment. RUBRIC Database Project Proposal – Part 1 No of Criteria: 11 Achievement Levels: 5 Criteria Achievement Levels DescriptionPercentage 1: Unsatisfactory 0.00 % 2: Less Than Satisfactory 74.00 % 3: Satisfactory 79.00 % 4: Good 87.00 % 5: Excellent 100.00 % Criteria 100.0   Statement of Project Problem and Definition of Terms 15.0 The discussion of the statement of the project problem and definition of terms is not present. The discussion of the statement of the project problem and definition of terms is present but lacks detail or is incomplete. The discussion of the statement of the project problem and definition of terms is present. The discussion of the statement of the project problem and definition of terms is detailed. The discussion of the statement of the project problem and definition of terms is thorough. Database Users 10.0 The discussion of database users (personnel/credentials), who they are, their competencies, and their background is not present. The discussion of database users (personnel/credentials), who they are, their competencies, and their background is present but lacks detail or is incomplete. The discussion of database users (personnel/credentials), who they are, their competencies, and their background is present. The discussion of database users (personnel/credentials), who they are, their competencies, and their background is detailed. The discussion of database users (personnel/credentials), who they are, their competencies, and their background is thorough. Types of Data to Collect for Proposed Database and Reports for Analysis 15.0 The discussion of the types of data that users will collect for the proposed database, at least three reports generated for analysis, and an explanation of their use and who will use the reports is not present. The discussion of the types of data that users will collect for the proposed database, at least three reports generated for analysis, and an explanation of their use and who will use the reports is present but lacks detail or is incomplete. The discussion of the types of data that users will collect for the proposed database, at least three reports generated for analysis, and an explanation of their use and who will use the reports is present. The discussion of the types of data that users will collect for the proposed database, at least three reports generated for analysis, and an explanation of their use and who will use the reports is detailed. The discussion of the types of data that users will collect for the proposed database, at least three reports generated for analysis, and an explanation of their use and who will use the reports is thorough. Project Goals and Clear Measurable Objectives for the Database 10.0 The discussion of the project goals, clear measurable objectives for the database, and steps to meet the goals and objectives is not present. The discussion of the project goals, clear measurable objectives for the database, and steps to meet the goals and objectives is present but lacks detail or is incomplete. The discussion of the project goals, clear measurable objectives for the database, and steps to meet the goals and objectives is present. The discussion of the project goals, clear measurable objectives for the database, and steps to meet the goals and objectives is detailed. The discussion of the project goals, clear measurable objectives for the database, and steps to meet the goals and objectives is thorough. Potential Problems or Barriers to Meeting the Project Goals and Objectives 10.0 The discussion of the forecast of potential problems or barriers to meeting the project goals, objectives, and specific assumptions that need to be made is not present. The discussion of the forecast of potential problems or barriers to meeting the project goals, objectives, and specific assumptions that need to be made is present but lacks detail or is incomplete. The discussion of the forecast of potential problems or barriers to meeting the project goals, objectives, and specific assumptions that need to be made is present. The discussion of the forecast of potential problems or barriers to meeting the project goals, objectives, and specific assumptions that need to be made is detailed. The discussion of the forecast of potential problems or barriers to meeting the project goals, objectives, and specific assumptions that need to be made is thorough. Conclusion: Value, Feasibility and Benefits of Expected Results 10.0 The discussion of the value of the project with emphasis on feasibility and the benefit of the expected results is not present. The discussion of the value of the project with emphasis on feasibility and the benefit of the expected results is present but lacks detail or is incomplete. The discussion of the value of the project with emphasis on feasibility and the benefit of the expected results is present. The discussion of the value of the project with emphasis on feasibility and the benefit of the expected results is detailed. The discussion of the value of the project with emphasis on feasibility and the benefit of the expected results is thorough. Thesis Development and Purpose 7.0 Paper lacks any discernible overall purpose or organizing claim. Thesis is insufficiently developed or vague. Purpose is not clear. Thesis is apparent and appropriate to purpose. Thesis is clear and forecasts the development of the paper. Thesis is descriptive and reflective of the arguments and appropriate to the purpose. Thesis is comprehensive and contains the essence of the paper. Thesis statement makes the purpose of the paper clear. Argument Logic and Construction 8.0 Statement of purpose is not justified by the conclusion. The conclusion does not support the claim made. Argument is incoherent and uses noncredible sources. Sufficient justification of claims is lacking. Argument lacks consistent unity. There are obvious flaws in the logic. Some sources have questionable credibility. Argument is orderly, but may have a few inconsistencies. The argument presents minimal justification of claims. Argument logically, but not thoroughly, supports the purpose. Sources used are credible. Introduction and conclusion bracket the thesis. Argument shows logical progressions. Techniques of argumentation are evident. There is a smooth progression of claims from introduction to conclusion. Most sources are authoritative. Clear and convincing argument that presents a persuasive claim in a distinctive and compelling manner. All sources are authoritative. Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, language use) 5.0 Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice or sentence construction is used. Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language choice (register) or word choice are present. Sentence structure is correct but not varied. Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but they are not overly distracting to the reader. Correct and varied sentence structure and audience-appropriate language are employed. Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present. The writer uses a variety of effective sentence structures and figures of speech. Writer is clearly in command of standard, written, academic English. Paper Format (use of appropriate style for the major and assignment) 5.0 Template is not used appropriately or documentation format is rarely followed correctly. Appropriate template is used, but some elements are missing or mistaken. A lack of control with formatting is apparent. Appropriate template is used. Formatting is correct, although some minor errors may be present. Appropriate template is fully used. There are virtually no errors in formatting style. All format elements are correct. Documentation of Sources (citations, footnotes, references, bibliography, etc., as appropriate to assignment and style) 5.0 Sources are not documented. Documentation of sources is inconsistent or incorrect, as appropriate to assignment and style, with numerous formatting errors. Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, although some formatting errors may be present. Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is mostly correct. Sources are completely and correctly documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is free of error. Total Percentage  100   Order Now